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1990-1999

1990-1999

1990

Pride's theme is "By All Means Necessary."

Mayor Art Eggleton still refuses to proclaim Pride Week. After he proclaims "Official Muppet Baby Day", the Pride Committee files a complaint of discrimination with the Ontario Human Rights Commission. Toronto City Council votes to officially proclaim Pride Day, then recants. The Ontario Human Rights Commission rules against the Committee which is now left with $10,000 in legal fees.

Aids Action Now holds a parade Die-In. 40,000 people come and celebrate this year.

1991

"Everyday, Everywhere: A New Decade of Pride" celebrates the tenth anniversary of the incorporation of the Pride Committee.

City Council proclaims Pride Day for the first time. The parade Grand Marshals this year are Two-Spirited People of the First Nations. 80,000 people celebrate.

In November, openly gay candidate Kyle Rae wins a seat as City Councillor for Ward 6.

1992

The Supreme Court rules that under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the Canadian Human Rights Act, gays and lesbians cannot be excluded from entering the Canadian Forces. The federal government does not appeal the ruling.

"Breaking the Silence" is Pride's theme. This year the Grand Marshals are children of gay and lesbian parents. 120,000 people attend.

1993

150,000 people take part in Pride Day in Toronto. To celebrate the theme "Come Out", the parade Grand Marshals are members of "support groups to gays and lesbians in the coming out process".

The parade starts at Carlton Street at Church, moves over to Yonge, up to Bloor and back over to Church. The Metropolitan Community Church holds services in the morning at Maple Leaf Gardens.

In the U.S., one million lesbians, gays and transgendered people attend the March On Washington with Canadians making up the largest international contingent.

1994

Pride's theme is "The Best is Yet To Come." The theme, chosen the previous fall, proves correct as provincial MPPs defeat Bill 167 recognizing same sex spousal benefits in Ontario after NDP Premier Bob Rae puts it to a free vote. Liberal opposition leader Lynn MacLeod flip flops, first supporting, then voting against the bill. Third party Progressive Conservative leader Mike Harris opposes the bill.

The parade Grand Marshals are drag kings and queens in celebration of the 25th anniversary of Stonewall. The Church Street Business Association lines Church Sreet with permanent rainbow flags. 400,000 people come and celebrate.

1995

For "Remember, Celebrate, Make a Difference", the parade Grand Marshals are Jim Egan and Jack Nesbit, who lose a spousal benefits decision but win a Supreme Court ruling that the Constitution recognizes the equality of lesbians and gays.

The Pride Committee collapses in February due to a mass resignation of a majority of the Board of Directors in a vote of non-confidence against the board itself. Kyle Rae assists community members to reorganize a new committee which in 15 weeks organizes Toronto's largest Pride Day, and North America's largest at 650,000 official celebrants.

New Police Chief David Boothby allows four lanes on Yonge Street to close for Canada's second largest parade, which takes over three hours. MPs Svend Robinson and Bill Graham, and Mayor Barbara Hall speak on the stages and walk in the parade.

1996

Pride's theme is "We Are Everyone's Family." The Grand Marshals are four lesbian couples who won the right to adopt their partner's children. 750,000 celebrated during Pride Day and throughout the three-hour parade. The first ever Dyke March is held, with a turnout on Saturday of 5,000.

The Pride stage runs for two days at 11 hours each day of continuous queer music, featuring Carole Pope, the Parachute Club, and comedian Elvira Kurt. The City of Toronto and the Pride Committee study Pride's economic impact and show that over 46 million dollars is spent by Pride tourists.

1997

"Queer By Nature" is the theme for Pride Week, running June 23rd-29th. An estimated crowd of 750,000 turn out for the week's events. The Pride Committee recognizes as Grand Marshals those individuals involved in establishing anti-homophobia initiatives within the education system in Toronto. They include Tim McCaskell, Tony Gambini, John Campey, Krin Zook, Vanessa Russel, Margot Francis, Doug Stewart, and Ken Watson. The sun shines on 10,000 women who take part in the second annual Dyke March.

1998

"MegaPride" is the theme for the first Pride Week celebration in the newly amalgamated "megacity" of Toronto, June 22nd-28th. After initial reservations, new "megamayor" Mel Lastman has a fantastic time on a firetruck in the parade, getting soaked by revellers with power waterguns. 12,000 women take part in the Dyke March.

1999

Pride Week's theme is "One Pride Fits All." Young people raise their profile at Pride, with a large contingent in the parade and the addition of Fruit Loopz as one of the entertainment events.

This time, Mayor Lastman is armed with his own "supersoaker," giving back to the crowd as good as he gets. Corporate sponsorship revenues are higher than ever and put Pride on firm financial footing for the next year.

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